Trends

Pay-for-Success Projects Spread to More States

In pay-for-success projects, donors, foundations, or other investors provide money for social programs that are expec...

In pay-for-success projects, donors, foundations, or other investors provide money for social programs that are expected to produce results that in the long run will save money for government agencies. If the programs achieve specific results, the government repays investors with a profit generated from those savings. If not, the government pays nothing.  The concept is being explored in more than a dozen states, but only a few programs are now under way.  Read more here.

Pay-for-Success Projects Spread to More States, January 28, 2014, Chronicle of Philanthropy, by Doug Donovan

Jewish Community Day of Action - February 18

To raise awareness about access to health coverage, the National Council of Jewish Women has declared a Jewish Commun...

To raise awareness about access to health coverage, the National Council of Jewish Women has declared a Jewish Community Day of Action on February 18.  Individuals and families across our country have just over 50 days left - until the March 31 deadline - to explore their options in the health insurance marketplace and to select coverage that works best for them, under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Please note that HHS has released the new 2014 Federal Poverty Levels, which will be used by states and the marketplace to determine a consumer's eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP.

Rereading "Collective Impact": Fresh insights gleaned from the article that started it all

All collaborations go through cycles.  To sustain the collaboration beyond the first journey through the cycle r...

All collaborations go through cycles.  To sustain the collaboration beyond the first journey through the cycle requires that participants constantly reassess the rationale and value proposition of the collaboration-to learn and affirm why they are committed to working with others.  We live in an age where instant gratification isn't nearly fast enough. Who is willing to work "several years" to develop the trusted relationships and capacity required to achieve collective impact? How do we create a several-year view when so many funders consider three years long-term? The disparity between time required and patience available is one reason why collaboration for collective impact is so elusive.  Read the full article to discover the three lessons the author has learned during his personal collective impact journey.

Rereading "Collective Impact", February 3, 2014, Stanford Social Innovation Review, by Chris Thompson